Sex Facts in Canada 2006

Sex Facts in Canada 2006

**taken from: www.sexualityandu.ca**  

Sexual Experience

  • The average age both male and female Canadians have sex for the first time is 16.5.1
  • 28% of teens aged 15-17 report having had sexual intercourse at least once. By age 20-24, this increases to 80%.2
  • In a 2005 report, 41% of males aged 15-17 and 39% of those aged 18-19 reported having more than one sexual partner in the previous year.3
  • For females in the study, 29% of 15-17 year olds and 31% of those aged 18-19 reported having more than one sexual partner in the previous year.4

Sex Education

  • Young people turn to parents and guardians as a primary source of sexual health education.5
  • A survey among grade nine students in Canada revealed that school was most frequently cited as the main source of information on human sexuality/puberty/birth control and HIV/AIDS.6
  • Over 85% of parents agree that sexual health education should be provided in schools, as do 92% of high school youth.7

Contraception

  • Oral contraceptives (i.e., the pill) are the most common method of contraception used by Canadian women who have had intercourse (32%), followed by condom use (21%).8
  • 39% of female grade nine students and 54% of grade 11 students used the pill the last time they had intercourse.9
  • The percentage of both male and female students who reported using a condom the last time they had sex decreased from grade nine to grade 11.10

Teen Pregnancy

  • Among 15-19 year old Canadian females, the pregnancy rate declined from 41.7 per 1,000 in 1998 to 40.2 in 1999 and 38.2 in 2000.11
  • The number of teenaged women who give birth has also declined, from 16.8 live births in 1997 to 12.1 in 2003.12
  • Though not scientifically conclusive, increased use of the birth control pill by females has corresponded with the drop in teen pregnancy rates.13

Safer Sex

  • Of sexually active adults aged 20-24, 44% reported having sex without a condom, compared with 33% of those aged 18-19 and 22% of those aged 15-17.14
  • 29% of males aged 15-19 and 44% of males aged 20-24 do not use condoms.15
  • For females, 51% aged 15-19 and 53% aged 20-24 do not use condoms.16
  • Of young people who reported in 2003 that they had sex with multiple partners within the past year, approximately three in 10 had not used a condom the last time they had sex.17

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)

  • The term sexually transmitted infection (STI) is now commonly used in place of sexually transmitted disease (STD) in order to include infections that may be asymptomatic.
  • In 2003, 854,817 people aged 15-49 who have ever had sexual intercourse reported ever being diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection.18
  • There are more than 25 classifications of STIs.19
  • STIs can lead to genital warts, blisters, infertility, spontaneous abortion, cancer and death.
  • While many STIs are curable, several are not, including Hepatitis B, genital herpes, Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

  • HPV is the world's most common sexually transmitted infection.
  • Over 80 types of HPV have been reliably identified, but researchers believe there are likely over 200.
  • It is estimated that 75% of Canadians will have at least one HPV infection in their lifetime.20
  • It is often referred to as a 'silent' infection as most cases are asymptomatic.
  • HPV is transmitted through vaginal, oral or anal sex as well as skin-to-skin contact.
  • HPV can cause skin warts, genital warts, pre-cancerous lesions and lead to certain types of cancers.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

  • From 1985 to 2005, a total of 60,160 positive HIV tests have been reported to the Public Health Agency of Canada.21
  • In Canada in 2005, approximately 30% of individuals with HIV were unaware of their infection.22
  • The average time between HIV infection and AIDS is 10 years.23

Chlamydia

  • Chlamydia is the most commonly reported STI in Canada.24
  • Close to 63,000 cases of chlamydia were reported in 2004, the highest number of cases since the disease became reportable in 1990.25
  • 40-70% of chlamydia cases present no symptoms. People may carry the infection for many years without knowing.26
  • From 1997 to 2004, rates in males rose from 58.7 to 129.5 per 100,000, more than doubling, while female rates increased by 57%, from 167.8 to 263.2 per 100,000.27
  • Females account for over two-thirds of all reported cases. Two-thirds of all reported cases are in the 15-24 age group.28
  • Consistent condom users (100% adherence) have significantly lower rates of infection compared with inconsistent condom users (25-27% adherence).29
  • Serious long-term health consequences are attributed to chlamydia including infertility, chronic pelvic pain and ectopic pregnancy, which can be a life-threatening medical emergency.

Gonorrhea

  • Gonorrhea is the second most commonly reported STI in Canada.30
  • Most men and women experience no symptoms.
  • Reported rates have nearly doubled from 14.9 per 100,000 in 1997 to 28.9 per 100,000 in 2004.31
  • Different from chlamydia, more than 60% of reported cases are attributed to males.32

Syphilis

  • Syphilis affects 3.5 per 100,000 people in Canada, nearly nine times the rate in 1997 (0.4 per 100,000).33
  • Syphilis is escalating in both males and females, but more so in males. 2004 rates for men were 15 times higher than in 1997 (6.3 vs. 0.4 per 100,000).34
  • Male cases appear to be driven by those over 30. 82% of reported male cases and 72% of overall cases are attributed to men aged 30-59.35

Taken from: www.sexualityandu.ca

www.sexualityandu.ca is the ultimate Canadian web site committed to providing accurate and up-to-date information and education on sexual health. From sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to contraception awareness, lifestyle choices to talking about sex, the site offers information for teens, adults, parents, teachers and health professionals. The web site is made possible with the guidance and collaboration of a team of distinguished Canadian medical organizations, and is led by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.


1Rotermann, M. Sex, condoms and STDs among young people. Statistics Canada: Health Reports, 16(3), 39-45. May 2005.
2Statistics Canada. Early sexual intercourse, condom use and sexually transmitted diseases. The Daily. May 3, 2005. Online. Available 02/06/06. http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/050503/d050503a.htm
3Rotermann, M. Sex, condoms and STDs among young people. Statistics Canada: Health Reports, 16(3), 39-45. May 2005.
4Ibid.
5SIECCAN. Sexual Health Education in the Schools: Questions and Answers. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 13(3-4), 129-141. Fall/Winter 2004.
6Ibid.
7Ibid.
8Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. SOGC Clinical Practice Guidelines, Canadian Contraception Consensus. No. 143 - Part 1 of 3, February 2004.
9SIECCAN. Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health in Canada: A Report Card in 2004. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 13(2), 67-81. Summer 2004.
10Ibid.
11SIECCAN. Sexual Health Education in the Schools: Questions and Answers. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 13(3-4), 129-131. Fall/Winter 2004.
12Statistics Canada. Induced Abortions. The Daily. March 15, 2006. Online. Available 02/06/06. http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/060315/d060315c.htm
13SIECCAN. Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health in Canada: A Report Card in 2004. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 13(2), 67-81. Summer 2004.
14Rotermann, M. Sex, condoms and STDs among young people. Statistics Canada: Health Reports, 16(3), 39-45. May 2005.
15Galambos, N. and L. Tilton-Weaver. Multiple-risk behaviour in adolescents and young adults. Statistics Canada: Health Reports, 10(2), 9-20. Autumn 1998.
16Ibid.
17Statistics Canada. Early sexual intercourse, condom use and sexually transmitted diseases. The Daily. May 3, 2005. Online. Available 02/06/06. http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/050503/d050503a.htm
18Statistics Canada. Canadian Community Health Survey. 2003. Custom Table. http://www.statcan.ca/english/sdds/0037ti.htm
19AVERT. An Introduction to STDs. Online. Available 02/06/06. http://www.avert.org/stds.htm
20Health Canada. Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Online. Available 08/06/06. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/iyh-vsv/diseases-maladies/hpv-vph_e.html
21Public Health Agency of Canada. HIV/AIDS in Canada. Surveillance Report to December 31, 2005. Online. Available 02/06/06. www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/aids-sida/haic-vsac1205/index.html
22AVERT. Canada HIV & AIDS Statistics Summary. Online. Available 02/06/06. http://www.avert.org/canstatg.htm
23Health Canada. HIV/AIDS. Online. Available 02/06/06. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/iyh-vsv/diseases-maladies/hiv-vih_e.html
24Public Health Agency of Canada. Canadian Communicable Disease Report. 2004 Canadian Sexually Transmitted Infections Surveillance Report: Pre-Release. May 2006.
25Ibid.
26SIECCAN. Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health in Canada: A Report Card in 2004. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 13(2), 67-81. Summer 2004.
27Public Health Agency of Canada. Canadian Communicable Disease Report. 2004 Canadian Sexually Transmitted Infections Surveillance Report: Pre-Release. May 2006.
28Ibid.
29SIECCAN. Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health in Canada: A Report Card in 2004. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 13(2), 67-81. Summer 2004.
30Public Health Agency of Canada. Canadian Communicable Disease Report. 2004 Canadian Sexually Transmitted Infections Surveillance Report: Pre-Release, May 2006
31Ibid.
32Ibid.
33Ibid.
34Ibid.
35Ibid.


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